heart in hands

There are moments when we mess up and we know we’re wrong.  Then there are times when we are wrong and don’t even know it.  Today’s verse from Psalm 19 strikes at the heart of humility.  I think this is especially prudent in today’s culture and even more so here in the States in the midst of all of the political pandering associated with primary season, and will only be amplfied during the general election of a new President of the USA.  With all the political rhetoric, especially on social media, it’s worth remembering, we may be wrong about a lot of things.  Slavery was an accepted practice. Hear the poetry of King David.  Even the king recognizes he may be wrong.  After admitting he knows he’s wrong on some things, he goes on to pen these words:

12 But can anyone know
    what they’ve accidentally done wrong?
    Clear me of any unknown sin
13         and save your servant from willful sins.
        Don’t let them rule me.
Then I’ll be completely blameless;
    I’ll be innocent of great wrongdoing.

14 Let the words of my mouth
    and the meditations of my heart
    be pleasing to you,
    Lord, my rock and my redeemer.

– Psalm 19:12-14 (CEB)

The key in all of this is the humility that David shows, a shining example for us, with words of wisdom as we move into the season of Lent. It’s an exercise in heart and mind and soul.  It requires a willingness to search deep into the heart of who we are and admit we are often wrong, and often don’t know it.  The hope in all of this is to become one who, by the words that we speak and the motives of our heart, is pleasing to the Lord, the one who shows us mercy when we are wrong.

Prayer:  Lord, Forgive me when I am wrong.  Show me where I am wrong and don’t know it.  My goal is to become pure in heart and pleasing to you.  Grant me mercy and the humility I need to become the person you have made and call me to be.  Amen.

Take a few minutes and click the link, close your eyes, and pray this song, offering your heart to God, like David did.

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